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MAJOR GENERAL FITZ-JOHN PORTER ~ COLONEL 15th U.S. INFANTRY
Item #: CWB5301
Click on an image to enlarge
backmark : ADDIS & KOCH / SAN FRANCISCO
3 CENT REVENUE STAMP ON REVERSE;
removed from Col. C.C. Hodges photo album;
Born: 08/31/1822 in Portsmouth, NH
Died: 05/21/1901 in Morristown, NJ
USMA: 1845, class rank: 08/41
Promotions
Date
To Rank
Full/Brevet
Army/Vol
Comments
05/14/61
Colonel
Full
Vol
15th RA Inf
05/17/61
Brig-Gen
Full
Vol

06/27/62
Brig-Gen
Brevet
Army

07/04/62
Major-Gen
Full
Vol


Commands
From
To
Brigade
Division
Corps
Army
10/03/61
03/13/62

Porter's

Army of Potomac
03/13/62
05/18/62

1
3
Army of Potomac
05/18/62
11/10/62


5
Army of Potomac
Porter, Fitz-John, major-general, was born in Portsmouth,
N. H., June 13, 1822, son of Commander John Porter of the
United States navy. He was graduated at the United States
military academy in 1845 and assigned to the 4th artillery, be-
coming 1st lieutenant, May 29 1847. He served creditably at
Vera Cruz and Cerro Gordo, was brevetted captain for gallant
and meritorious conduct at Molino del Rey and major for serv-
ices at Chapultepec. He was present also at the capture of the
City of Mexico and was wounded at the Belen gate. In the in-
terval between the Mexican and Civil wars he served on garrison
duty and as instructor at West Point became assistant adjutant-
general with the rank of captain in 1856, and served during the
troubles in Kansas and in the Utah expedition. He was promoted
colonel of the 15th infantry, May 14, 1861, and on May 17, was
appointed brigadier-general of volunteers. After taking part
in the action of Falling Waters on July 2, Gen. Porter com-
manded a division in the defenses of Washington, 1861-62, and
in the Virginia Peninsular campaign in the spring of I862, di-
recting the siege of Yorktown, April 5 - May 4. From May to
August he commanded the 5th army corps, Army of the Potomac,
and directed its operations in the battles of New bridge, Hano-
ver Court House, Mechanicsville, Gaines' mill, Turkey tavern,
and Malvern hill. He was promoted major-general of volunteers
on July 4, having been brevetted brigadier-general U. S. A. on
June 27 for gallantry at Chickahominy, was transferred to
northern Virginia in August and commanded his corps under Pope
at the second battle of Bull Run, subsequently protecting Wash-
ington by occupying the right bank of the Potomac. At Antietam
he commanded the 5th army corps under McClellan, and on Sept.
19, he fought with his own troops along the battle of Shepherd-
stown and captured four guns. He was relieved of his command
in November, and was ordered to Washington to appear before a
military commission and answer charges preferred against him by
Gen. Pope. A court-martial was subsequently ordered, the first
order being revoked, and on Nov. 25 he was arrested, the
charges against him being made known on Dec. 1. He was charged
with having failed to join Pope at Bristoe on the morning of
Aug. 28, and with having disobeyed two orders at the second
battle of Bull Run on Aug. 30, one to advance and the other to
retreat. The court-martial found him guilty of the charges
preferred, and he was cashiered Jan. 21, 1863, and "forever
disqualified from holding any office of trust or profit under
the government of the United States." The justice or injustice
of the verdict was the subject of much controversy, and numer-
ous appeals were subsequently made by Porter to have the case
reopened. The clause providing that he should never again be
permitted to hold office under the United States was remitted
in 1882, and in 1885 President Arthur vetoed a bill which had
passed both houses restoring him to his rank in the army, on
the grounds that Congress lacked constitutional authority to
pass such a bill. In 1886, however, President Cleveland signed
a similar bill, and he was re-appointed colonel, U. S. A., his
commission dating from May 14, 1861. After leaving the army
Gen. Porter was engaged in business in New York for a time; was
superintendent of the construction of the New Jersey insane
asylum, 1872-75; commissioner of public works in New York city,
1875-77; assistant receiver of the Central railroad of New Jer-
sey, 1877-82; police commissioner of New York city, 1884-88;
fire commissioner, 1888-89; and cashier of the New York post-
office, 1893-97. He declined an offer made him by the Khedive
of Egypt in 1869 to command his army with the rank of major-
general. Gen. Porter died in Morristown, N. J., May 21, 1901.
Shipping Weight: 0.75 lb
 $95.00 USD